Tag Archives: electric oven

Electric Oven is Slow to Heat or Not Reaching the Correct Temperature

Electric Oven is Slow to Heat or Not Reaching the Correct Temperature An electric oven is slow to heat or not reaching the correct temperature most likely has a problem with the heating element. However it is also possible that the oven’s internal temperature is off. Some ovens have a dial that can be adjusted or calibrated. Other models have an electronic control board which regulates the ovens temperature that can be altered in order to provide a better baking experience. Here’s how to do this.

WARNING! Before attempting to work on any appliance, make sure that all power (electricity) and utilities (water and gas) have been turned off and/or disconnected on the appliance. Read this before you start any repair.  

How to Test Your Oven’s Temperature

Get an oven-safe thermometer and place it in the middle of the center rack. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, Continue reading

Easy oven repair: replacing the bake element in an electric oven

If you have an electric oven and it’s not heating up like it should (or at all) then you might have a faulty bake element. Sometimes, the bake element is visibly damaged or even falls apart altogether, so it’s easy to tell that you need a new electric oven bake element replacement part.

Whirlpool electric oven bake element. Part 74003019

Whirlpool electric oven bake element. Part number: 74003019

Replacing the bake element in an electric oven is an affordable and super easy fix. First, find the correct part for your stove by locating your appliance’s model number. Usually, it’s on a sticker inside your stove’s lower storage drawer, but not IN the drawer, but on the appliance. Here are some other places to look: http://www.everyappliancepart.com/help_finding_model_number.php

Once you have that, copy down the model number and enter it into the search box on EveryAppliancePart.com to find the right part for your appliance.

Once you have your part, unplug your appliance or shut off the power to the appliance before you make your repair.

  1. Disconnect and remove your old bake element by removing the screws that hold the element in place to the inside back wall of your oven.
  2. Gently pull the old broken element forward. You will see that there are wires running to the element which provides the electricity in order to heat the element. You may need a pair of needle nose pliers to remove these wire leads. VERY IMPORTANT – don’t let these wires disappear through the holes into the body of your oven. If you do, you will need to remove the wall oven in order to get them back, which is a lot of work.
  3. Attach the wires to your new bake element (these usually slide in) and then push the new bake element into place.  Replace the screws and you are done.
  4. Connect the power back to your electric range and turn your oven on to see if it works.

Who invented your favorite household appliance?

May is National Inventors Month founded in 1998 by United Inventors Association of the USA (UIA-USA), the Academy of Applied Science, and Inventors’ Digest Magazine. Do you know who invented your favorite household appliance? Read on to find out.

Who invented your favorite household appliance?

Who invented your favorite household appliance?

The Washing Machine

Alva J. Fisher is credited with creating the first commercially-sold electric powered washing machine in 1908. The machine was called “The Thor” and was produced by the Hurley Machine Company of Chicago, Illinois. It featured a galvanized tub, blades which lifted the clothes as the cylinder rotated and the ability for the drum to change rotation direction in order to prevent the laundry from becoming bunched up into a ball. An electric motor turned the drum.

The Refrigerator

Although refrigeration technology was already being used for industry, especially in food and drink-related industries, Fred W. Wolf of Fort Wayne, Indiana, is credited with inventing the first electrical refrigerator for home use in 1913. The appliance was called the “Domelre,” standing for Domestic Electric Refrigerator and sold for $900.

Wolf used an old fashioned ice box with a mounted refrigeration unit on top which required external plumbing connections. His invention also used a closed system of circulating refrigerant driven by a compressor to cool the hot humid, air.

In 1918, General Motors’ President William Durant bought the Guardian Refrigerator Company and renamed it Frigidaire. It purchased the patent for the Domelre and through its own engineering and manufacturing, introduced improvements to the refrigerator and began mass producing it.

The Oven

British inventor, James Sharp patented a gas oven in 1826 and began to commercially produce gas ovens after installing one in his own house.

Gas cookers became more popular after the invention of the oven thermostat in 1923 which allowed the temperature in the oven to be controlled precisely.

William Hadaway was issued the first patent for an electric oven on June 30, 1896.

The Air Conditioner

Willis Haviland Carrier of Buffalo, N.Y. is credited with creating the first modern air conditioning system and such systems were used in factories, department stores, theaters and in the homes of wealthy people. It wasn’t until 1931 when the first individual in-window air conditioning unit was created by H.H. Schultz and J.Q. Sherman. The units were not wide-spread due to their exorbitant costs between $10,000

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